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Googlebot IP Addresses: The Ultimate Guide

Updated: September 13, 2021

Googlebot crawls your website from specific IP addresses. This guide will provide you with a complete list of Googlebot IP addresses and walk you through the steps to verify them.

The Ultimate Guide to Googlebot IP Addresses

A Complete List of Googlebot IP Addresses

Here is a complete list of Googlebot IP addresses.

  • 64.18.0.0 – 64.18.15.255
  • 64.68.80.0 – 64.68.92.255
  • 64.233.160.0 – 64.233.191.255
  • 66.102.0.0 – 66.102.15.255
  • 66.249.61.0 – 66.249.95.255
  • 72.14.192.0 – 72.14.255.255
  • 74.125.0.0 – 74.125.255.255
  • 108.177.8.0 – 108.177.15.255
  • 172.217.0.0 – 172.217.31.255
  • 173.194.0.0 – 173.194.255.255
  • 203.208.0.0 – 203.208.255.255
  • 207.126.144.0 – 207.126.159.255
  • 209.85.128.0 – 209.85.255.255
  • 209.185.108.0 – 209.185.108.255
  • 209.185.253.0 – 209.185.253.255
  • 216.33.229.0 – 216.33.229.255
  • 216.58.192.0 – 216.58.223.255
  • 216.239.32.0 – 216.239.63.255

Verifying IP Addresses of Googlebot

Let me tell you why you need to verify the identity of Googlebot and how you can do that.

Why You Need to Verify Googlebot

When Googlebot visits your website, you web server records the IP address and the user agent of the search engine crawler in log files. The following is an example.

66.249.90.77 – – [DD/MM/YYYY:TIMESTAMP] "GET /robots.txt HTTP/x.x" 200 0 "-" "Mozilla/x.x (compatible; Googlebot/x.x;)"

The first part is the IP address of the visiting crawler(also known as a bot). It’s not possible that this IP address is faked or spoofed unless your website is under a DDOS attack. Crawlers wouldn’t be able to get any data back to their servers if they faked their IP addresses. The reason is simple: IP addresses are logical network locations where requests are initiated and responses are received.

The last part is the user agent. In the example above, the user agent is “Googlebot”. It is absolutely possible that this part is faked. Therefore, don’t just believe what you see in log files when it comes to user agents. Crawlers or bots can easily fake their identities to achieve their malicious objectives.

It is not difficult to verify Googlebot’s identity with third-party network tools. On CentOS/RHEL/Fedora, the tool package is bind-utils. On Ubuntu/Debian, the tool package is dnsutils. On Windows, the tool is nslookup.

The following are the detailed instructions on how to install the tools and verify the IP addresses of Googlebot on both Linux and Windows systems.

Verifying Googlebot on CentOS/RHEL/Fedora

Run the following command to install bind-utils on CentOS/RHEL/Fedora.

[login@host ~]# yum install bind-utils

Your RPM-based system is now capable of identifying the Googlebot. The next step is a reverse DNS lookup. Run the host command with the search engine crawler’s IP address like the example below.

[login@host ~]# host 66.249.90.77
77.90.249.66.in-addr.arpa domain name pointer rate-limited-proxy-66-249-90-77.google.com.

After you have obtained the hostname, do a forward DNS lookup and make sure the returned IP address is the same. The following is an example.

[login@host ~]# host rate-limited-proxy-66-249-90-77.google.com
rate-limited-proxy-66-249-90-77.google.com has address 66.249.90.77
[login@host ~]#

The information above verifies that the IP address 66.249.90.77 is indeed from Google.

You can also use the nslookup tool for IP address verification on CentOS/RHEL/Fedora and this tool is also a part of the bind-utils package.

Verifying Googlebot on Ubuntu/Debian

Run the following command to install dnsutils on Ubuntu/Debian.

login@host:~# sudo apt-get update
login@host:~# sudo apt-get install dnsutils -y

Similar to the instructions for RPM-based systems above, the next steps include a reverse DNS lookup and then a forward DNS lookup.

login@host:~# host 66.249.90.77
77.90.249.66.in-addr.arpa domain name pointer rate-limited-proxy-66-249-90-77.google.com.
login@host:~# host rate-limited-proxy-66-249-90-77.google.com
rate-limited-proxy-66-249-90-77.google.com has address 66.249.90.77
login@host:~#

Now this Googlebot’s IP address is successfully verified with a name server lookup.

You can also use the nslookup tool to accomplish similar tasks on Ubuntu/Debian after the installation of the dnsutils package.

Verifying Googlebot on Windows

You don’t need to install anything to verify Googlebot on Windows. The Name Server Lookup tool is a part of the default installation of Windows. Open a Command Prompt window and run the nslookup command with the search engine crawler’s IP address.

C:\Users\login>nslookup 66.249.90.77
Name: rate-limited-proxy-66-249-90-77.google.com
Address: 66.249.90.77

The command line above is a reverse DNS lookup by IP address on Windows.

Now, do a forward DNS lookup with the hostname you have obtained above.

C:\Users\login>nslookup rate-limited-proxy-66-249-90-77.google.com
Name: rate-limited-proxy-66-249-90-77.google.com
Address: 66.249.90.77

The lookup results above provide you with sufficient information to verify Googlebot’s IP address on Windows.

Non-U.S. IP Addresses Used by Googlebot

Although Google is an American company and most of its IP addresses are U.S.-based, Googlebot does use non-U.S. IP addresses from various countries.

Using non-U.S. IP addresses allows Google to discover if the content of a website will change for international users when website traffic is coming from different countries.

The data collected from Googlebot’s international IP addresses will help Google improve its search quality globally by providing international searchers with the most relevant search results.